On The Bias

A crafting show by Michaela Harkins and Corey Forbus

Episode 14 Challenge Accepted!

In Episode 14, Corey and I decided to challenge ourselves to make something small and quick — in other words, to just DO something.

I am plagued by undone projects. In a way, they bring me comfort and provide continuity to my life: I know that I have at least two gray wraps started, one sweater awaiting seaming, another sweater on the needles, and one in the swatch phase. When the spirit moves me (depending on mood, temperature, and humidity), I can pick up a project and just continue knitting as if it were a conversation with a friend.

But start and finishing something quickly? That IS a challenge.

After deciding that finishing a project that I started in March didn’t count for the challenge, I decided to see if I could start and finish the “tea quilt” that was part of my subscription to Katrina Rodebaugh’s Summer Slow Design kits. It was so liberating and truly a quick, wonderful project that I can imagine doing again, using scrap material from clothing. Here’s what I got up to:

Framing and picking materials to trace circles...Sashiko tea quilt

What I’ll be stitching!
Sashiko tea quilt

Wonky circles — but moving along more quickly than I expected.
Sashiko tea quilt

Done with part one of the project!
Sashiko tea quilt

Here’s the backing fabric (I love this fabric — it’s a relatively loose weave which means it should be easy to stitch).
Sashiko tea quilt

Clover clips to the rescue...no pinning! This is the top clipped to some batting and the bottom fabric.
Sashiko tea quilt

...and now a running stitch along the edge to make sure it all stays together.
Sashiko tea quilt

(Gratuitous photo of the backing to show off the few relatively even stitches...)
Sashiko tea quilt

Stitching detail. I love sashiko stitching!!
Sashiko tea quilt

Done and ready!
Sashiko tea quilt

The total project time clocked in somwhere between 2.5 - 3 hours. I managed not to overthink the design and the stitching was much faster than I expected. Ironing and clipping the pieces together took the most time.

Verdict? This project is now living on the kitchen table where it will get daily use. Now I want to use all the stray denim I’ve saved to make more!

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